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Wyoming Senator Malcolm Wallop Memorial Service




Memorial Service for former Senator Malcolm Wallop includes former Senator Alan K. Simpson and Wyoming Governor Matt Mead.

Biography - Malcolm Wallop was born in New York, graduated from the Cate School in Santa Barbara, California, and attended Yale University, where he was a member of St. Anthony Hall. His roots in Wyoming stemmed back to pioneer ancestors in Big Horn. After his graduation from Yale in 1954, Wallop served in the U.S. Army as a first lieutenant from 1955 to 1957. He worked for a decade as a cattle rancher and small businessman, having entered politics in 1969 as a successful candidate for the Wyoming House of Representatives. He served two terms, followed by a stint in the Wyoming State Senate from 1973 to 1976. In 1974, Wallop sought the Republican gubernatorial nomination but was defeated by Richard R. âDickâ Jones, a trucking executive from Cody and Powell in Park County in northwestern Wyoming. Jones went on to lose the general election in a heavily Democratic year to Edgar Herschler of Kemmerer in Lincoln County in southwestern Wyoming.
In 1976, in another nationally Democratic year, Wallop unseated three-term Democrat U.S. Senator Gale W. McGee by a margin of nearly 10 points in a rare bright spot for Republicans that year.
In the 1980s he was the senior member of a conservative Wyoming triumvirate that included Dick Cheney, then a congressman, and Alan K. Simpson, then the junior senator, whose collective clout belied the stateâs small population.
As a senator he was an outspoken proponent of cutting taxes, limiting federal control over the workings of states and the lives of individuals and containing communism. He opposed Social Security, many environmental regulations and arms control treaties, which, he argued, compromised the ability of the United States to defend itself.
As a member of the Senate Finance Committee, Mr. Wallop, with Senator David L. Boren, Democrat of Oklahoma, sponsored legislation that would reduce estate and gift taxes. Their proposals became components of the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981, signed into law by President Ronald Reagan that August.
Wallop was also a leading and early supporter of what became the Strategic Defense Initiative. Initiated by Mr. Reagan in 1983, the program was intended to develop a space-based antiballistic missile system, though it was later abandoned.
Wallop died at his home near the small community of Big Horn in northern Wyoming on September 14, 2011 at the age of 78.


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